Archive for March, 2012

Resources for Mesothelioma

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

When facing a diagnosis of mesothelioma, knowing where to turn for information and support can make an enormous difference. While there may be local agencies in your area that provide support related to asbestos exposure or mesothelioma, it is important to understand the role and resources provided by the following agencies.

The EPA

Founded in 1970, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) exists to safeguard our nation’s water, air and land. The EPA website contains a wealth of information about the uses of asbestos, laws and regulations regarding asbestos, and guidelines for asbestos disposal.

OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is the government agency responsible for promoting workplace safety in order to prevent work-related illness and injury. This branch of the Department of Labor creates regulations and standards for workplace safety. On the OSHA website, you will find information about the industries affected by mesothelioma, the safe handling of asbestos and other useful information and resources.

The NCI

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is the national agency responsible for promoting cancer research, development and training through funding and awareness. The NCI website has information about how asbestos is linked to mesothelioma and the available treatments and therapeutic approaches to mesothelioma (both traditional and cutting edge). The site also has a comprehensive list of resources.

The NIOSH

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) operates to promote research, education and training related to workplace health and safety. On the NIOSH website, you can find numerous articles on the risks and prevention of mesothelioma.

The ATSDR

The purpose of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is to protect the public from environmental hazard. The ATSDR website approaches asbestos and mesothelioma from a public health perspective, with a great overview of asbestos exposure and it’s risks.

Making effective choices begins with being fully informed. For more information about mesothelioma victims rights, click the previous link or fill out our online form.

Caring for Someone With Mesothelioma

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

When a loved one chooses to be a caregiver for another member of the family who is ill, it is often with great love and commitment that they make that choice. But providing care for someone who has mesothelioma can be a very challenging role to play. In addition to taking on activities such as scheduling mesothelioma treatment appointments, managing medications, and assisting with daily routines, you may also be needed as a source of comfort and listening, even when the victim is experiencing grief and anger. Many caregivers report experiencing overwhelm and even burnout. If you are planning to be a primary caregiver for someone who has mesothelioma, here are a few suggestions that may make your experience more manageable.

First, keep in mind that maintaining your own health is critical to providing consistent and thoughtful care to someone who has mesothelioma. Setting up your schedule to include regular meals, quality sleep, and sufficient breaks can help alleviate stress. Stress-reducing activities such as exercise, reading or prayer and meditation may also prove to be very helpful. Planning for these activities may involve hiring outside help, but the benefits of renewed energy and a refreshed outlook will make the expense well worth it.

On the subject of getting help, you may want to consider lining up one or more backup caregiver. It’s very helpful to have someone who can step in the case that you are sick or have an urgent personal matter to attend to. It also makes a difference to have someone else take over for extended periods of time so that you can have time to restore and to handle personal matters that can fall to the wayside when caring for another.

While caring for your loved one, you may have questions about mesothelioma or mesothelioma victims rights. With the combined effects of lost income, the cost of treatment, and other expenses, caring for someone with mesothelioma can become a financial burden for many families. You may want to find out whether you qualify for certain programs. For example, some insurance companies reimburse caregivers and even such things as housecleaning or other assistance. Joining a support group may also be very helpful. Taking the time to explore these resources can save time and money, as well as help maintain your health and well-being.

Friability and Asbestos

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

In the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s, uses of asbestos in home construction was common. Because of its high tensile strength and resistant properties, thousands of asbestos products have been used widely in the construction industry, especially during this time period. As more and more of these homes are being renovated, the risk of exposure to asbestos is a reality that construction workers, homeowners and do-it-yourselfers should be aware of. Preventing exposure during asbestos disposal begins with understanding the difference between friable and non-friable asbestos.

When asbestos is friable, it exists in a form that can easily be broken into pieces, releasing fibers into the air. Acoustical plaster, asbestos paper, pipe coverings, insulation, and asbestos -containing patching compounds are all examples of friable asbestos. Non-friable asbestos, on the other hand, are not easy to break, and as a result, the asbestos fibers are less likely to be released into the air. When left undisturbed, non-friable asbestos may not endanger human health. That’s why asbestos experts advise that certain asbestos containing materials be left alone when remodeling rather than being removed. Examples of non-friable asbestos products include roofing felt, asbestos cement, vinyl flooring, and base flashing.

The EPA identifies two categories of non-friable asbestos. Category 1 non-friable have a binding material that locks the fibers together, and are therefore not likely to become friable. Category 2 non-friable materials, though, are more subject to damage by frequent use and natural deterioration over time. Category 2 non-friable materials are more likely to become friable due to weathering conditions. However, circumstances can also influence whether an asbestos-containing material can become friable during demolition or construction. These factors involve methods of ventilation, demolition and asbestos disposal, as well as how the material itself was made.  The EPA website has guidelines for how to address both  friable and non-friable materials. For more information about asbestos and mesothelioma, visit Mesothelioma FAQ